A resource for schools and educators

About the All of Us programme

The activities and resources in this programme have been designed for upper KS1 teachers and informal educators. After registering on the All of Us website all teaching materials, resources, access to the All of Us animated film and any updates are available to you free of charge. An All of Us preparation and training session is available as an after school, daytime or evening session for schools or youth organisations.

We also provide a KS2 activity and resource pack and encourage KS1 and KS2 teachers to familiarise themselves with both curricula to gauge which activities are most suitable for your cohort of young people.

The All of Us syllabus is designed as a stand-alone programme but can help teachers deliver aspects of the PHSE national curriculum. Please see below for more details. We strongly recommend that you re-watch the All of Us film before you deliver these lessons. Viewing the film at least twice will make following the lesson plans much easier. The film is referred to throughout the lessons and is the main resource at the heart of this campaign. The programme can be delivered over the course of an academic year, with 1-2 lessons delivered per term, as a shorter programme with all activities delivered in one term, or as an intensive one day off-timetable activity with an assembly in the afternoon.

Teacher evaluation forms are linked on the website. We require all teachers using these free resources, lessons and activities to complete evaluation forms at the end of the programme. We look forward to receiving your feedback which guides in producing further free teaching materials.

This lesson plan contains the following:

  • One introductory lesson with accompanying presentation and resources.
  • Two follow-on lessons with accompanying resource presentations and resources.
  • One assembly plan with accompanying presentation.
  • Two of the activities (from lessons 1 and 2) can be turned into a classroom display, we have therefore also included templates to help you with these displays.
  • Teacher evaluation forms – we require all teachers delivering these lessons and activities to complete evaluation forms at the end of the programme.
  • Two versions of the All of Us film.
    • Version 1 uses a voiceover.
    • Version 2 is without voiceover.
    • We recommend KS1 and Lower KS2 teachers use the version with a voiceover and Upper KS2 use the film without voiceover.

KEY CONCEPTS AND ACTIVITIES:

CONFLICT:
By watching the All of Us film and taking part in drama activities, pupils learn about a fictional conflict and about how some of the characters feel about the conflict.

SIMILARITY AND DIFFERENCE:
Through class discussion and individual worksheets pupils develop a language to discuss the similarities and differences between them.

EMOTIONS – DEALING WITH ANGER AND SHOWING KINDNESS:
Exploring how a fictional character could deal with their anger can help pupils manage their own angry feelings. Taking part in a group activity on kindness helps pupils see how their kind behaviour can positively affect others.

TOGETHERNESS:
To stimulate ideas around how pupils and staff in the school can continue positively contributing to the safety and wellbeing of the school and community.

KEY MESSAGES:

Sending messages to (fictional) people affected by conflict can help us to become better friends and be kinder people in real life.

There are things that make us individual and there are things we have in common with others. There is room for both similarity and difference in our school and both similarity and difference should be respected and celebrated.

We all have angry feelings and there are ways that can help us feel better when we are angry. We also all have kind feelings and it makes everyone feel better when we share kind words with each other.

We all have brilliant ideas and we all share responsibility for making our community safe, happy and free from discrimination. As a school community, we can find ways to come together and challenge prejudice from others and within ourselves.

Links to the National PHSE curriculum

 The All of Us KS1 and KS2 programme covers some aspects within the national PHSE curriculum. It is designed to help schools deliver some parts of the compulsory PHSE curriculum.

Specifically, the All of Us KS1 programme explores:

Core Theme 2:

RELATIONSHIPS

How to recognise and manage emotions within a range of relationships

How to respect equality and diversity in relationships

Core Theme 3:

LIVING IN THE WIDE WORLD

Economic wellbeing and being a responsible citizen

About respect for self and others and the importance of responsible behaviours and actions

About different groups and communities

To respect diversity and equality and how to be a productive member of a diverse community

Lesson 1: CONFLICT

Understanding that there is a conflict happening in a fictional community; trying to understand how some of the characters feel about the conflict.

OBJECTIVES:

Conflict: By watching the All of Us film and taking part in drama activities, pupils learn about a fictional conflict and about how some of the characters feel about the conflict.

KEY MESSAGES:

Sending messages to (fictional) people affected by conflict can help us to become better friends and be kinder people in real life.

RESOURCES:

All of Us Film – we recommend ‘with voiceover’ for KS1
Freeze Frame Images 1 – 5
Paper and Pens
Speech Bubble Templates
Classroom Display

Core theme 2: Relationships

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

R1. To communicate their feelings to others, to recognise how others show feelings and how to respond

R5. To share their opinions on things that matter to them and explain their views through discussions with one other person and the whole class

ACTIVITY 1

AIM:

To get students thinking about themes of conflict and community.

TIME:

0-7 minutes

RESOURCE:

All of Us FIlm

The All of Us Film

Preamble to film:

Let students know that they are about to watch a short animated film, or cartoon.

Ask them how best to watch a film as a member of an audience – paying attention, not distracting others or talking.

Let students know there might be some worrying bits in the film but also funny and colourful parts too.

Watch the film (length without credits:05:41).

ACTIVITY 2

AIM:

To illustrate that prejudice such as racism or religious intolerance can escalate into a serious conflict.

To demonstrate that children are often most affected by conflict but that they may also have ideas for solutions to conflict.

PHSE L1

TIME:

10-20 minutes

RESOURCE:

All of Us Film

Prompt Questions on Presentation Slide 3

 

The All of Us film

Preamble to film:

Let students know that they are about to watch a short animated film. Ask them how best to watch a film as a member of an audience. Remind students to keep a mental note of any questions that come up during the film so that they can ask them afterwards.

Watch the film (length without credits: 05:41). Post film – whole class discussion:

Respond quickly to any immediate questions or emotional responses.

Make sure the children understand that the only thing separating the two groups of people in the film is the colour of the clothes.

Propose the following questions:

  • What does the film remind you of in real life? (they might say the war is Syria, WW2, Apartheid, struggle for Civil Rights in America, divorce, arguments between friends in the playground
  • What could the difference in clothes colour represent (e.g. racism, religious intolerance etc)?

Make sure the students begin to understand that:

  • These conflicts happen in real
  • The only visible thing separating the two communities is the colour of their clothes, not the colour of their skin.
  • There is a flashback in the

Additional questions could be:

  • Who is to blame for this conflict?
  • Who is behaving in a kinder way, the children or the adults?
  • Do you think the roots of this conflict started much earlier – even before the setting in the film?
  • What do you think happens next?

ACTIVITY 3

AIM:

To help the students understand that the film does not happen in chronological order and that there is a flashback sequence in the film; that this flashback sequence is very important to the story telling as it shows when the conflict started.

Later in the lesson and as the programme continues the flashback sequence will be used a focal point for discussing how the conflict could be prevented, for example in the ‘message to adults’ activity.

PHSE R11

TIME:

20-35 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slides 4-8: These images on the PowerPoint are from different sections of the film will help the students navigate the order of the film

Freeze Frame Activity Freeze-frames definition:

Dramatic images where the action in a scene is frozen. A good way to describe a freeze frame is that it is like pressing the pause button on a remote control, taking a photo or making a statue.

Teachers should always model a freeze-frame first, for example, show the class a freeze frame of ‘playing tennis’.

There are two options for the Freeze Frames activity.

Freeze Frames option 1:

Ask students to work in groups of five/six to create five freeze-frames that tell the story of the film.

Groups should give each of their five freeze-frames a title. Good probe and challenge questions include:

  • What happened at the beginning of the film?
  • Was the beginning of the film the same as the beginning of the story?
  • Did the film tell the story in order?
  • Was there a flashback in the film?
  • How did the story end?

Note that groups may tell the story chronologically, or in the order of the film.

Freeze Frames option 2:

Useful if there is less time or not much space in the classroom.

Write the numbers 1–5 on the board. Say to the students that you’re going to split the film into five sections and as a class give a title to each of these sections.

You can already decide that section 3 is going to be called ‘Flashback: in the playground’ or something similar (this will help the students understand the film doesn’t happen chronologically).

Get name suggestions for sections 1–5 from the class, e.g.

1: Secret Plan

2: Breaking the Barrier

3: Flashback in the Playground 4: The Bridge Falls

5: Hanging on the Cliff

Split the class into five groups and give them each the title to turn into a freeze frame.

Additional option:

If there is a sixth group you can ask them to create a freeze frame of what they think happens next in the film, what happens after the cliffhanger – do the girls get saved somehow?

Freeze Frames should be shared with the whole class no matter which option you choose.

Depending on time, all groups can show their work or select groups can. Emphasize and congratulate the character work the students do – the excellent expressions, their physicality etc.

ACTIVITY 4

AIM:

Students must understand that the flashback sequence shows the conflict starting and should begin to identify that this flashback could be a very important moment of intervention for conflict prevention.

PHSE R7

TIME:

35-40 minutes

RESOURCE:

None needed

Time Machine

Bring pupils together as a class and pose the following questions to them:

  • If we had a time machine and could go back in time to any point in the film in order to save the main characters, which point in time would we go back to?

Ask pupils for suggestions (hands up or think, pair share). Take some pupil suggestions until someone arrives at bringing the time machine to the flashback sequence i.e. the scene in the playground that shows he conflict/war starting.

ACTIVITY 5

AIM:

To show that children may often have really great ideas for how we can make the school/community/world a fairer place; that each of the students in the class have a powerful voice.

PHSE R7 & L1

TIME:

40-55 minutes

RESOURCE:

Pens/Pencils and Paper Presentation Slides 9-10

Message to Adults

Hand a small piece of paper to each of the students.

They must write their names on this as you will need to identify which message belongs to which student at the end of the programme.

Ask pupils to write down a message to the adults in the film.

It is useful to frame this by asking the students to imagine that they are still in the flashback sequence in the playground:

What message do they want to tell the adults that will help them stop fighting?

This must be done in silence to allow for personal reflection.

When they’re finished you can choose a few students to read out their messages, or place all of the messages around the room/on a wall and invite the class to walk around and read the messages.

Leave the students with a closing thought:

  • Is it easy to take this advice?
  • Is taking responsibility for things easy or difficult?
  • Why?

At the end of the session collect all the pupil messages and keep them for later – you will refer back to this at the end of the programme in Lesson 4.

Lesson 2: SIMILARITY AND DIFFERENCE

Understanding and celebrating similarity and difference.

OBJECTIVES:

Similarity and Difference: Through class discussion and individual worksheets, pupils develop a language to discuss the similarities and differences between them.

KEY MESSAGES:

There are things that make us unique and there are things that unite us. There is room for both similarity and difference in our school/community/world and both similarity and difference should be respected and celebrated.

LESSON LENGTH:

55 minutes

RESOURCES:

All of Us Film – with or without voiceover depending on age of pupils KS2 – Lesson 2 PowerPoint
Pens/Pencils
Kite Templates printed, one per pupil
Classroom Display Template (post lesson when preparing the classroom display)

LINKS TO PHSE CURRICULUM

Core theme 2: Relationships

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

R13. That differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors, including family, cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity, age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability.

Core theme 3: Living in the wider world – economic wellbeing and being a responsible citizen

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

L11. To appreciate the range of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom.

L12. To consider the lives of people living in other places, and people with different values and customs.

ACTIVITY 1

AIM:

To get students thinking about things that make them individual and things that connect them to others in the class.

TIME:

0-12 minutes

RESOURCE:

None needed

Game: Anyone who…

Sit students in a circle of chairs with no tables or obstacles nearby.

Select one student to stand in the middle to begin the game and take their chair away – meaning that there will be one less chair than there are students.

Ask the student in the middle to share a statement that is true to them and that is also true of other people in the room.

For example, ‘Anyone who… is wearing brown shoes’, or ‘Anyone who…has curly hair’.

If the statement is true to other pupils sitting in the circle they must get up move to another seat in the circle.

They can’t just move to the seat directly next to them and as soon as they get up students must move to a new chair – not rush back to where they were sat before.

The student from the middle must try to take a seat in the circle too.

This will mean that a new pupil will be in the middle (as there is one less chair than there are pupils).

The new pupil in the middle of the circle will now have to say a statement that is true to them and hopefully also true of others in the circle:

  • ‘Anyone who….’

Repeat this a few times.

Its useful to start the ‘Anyone who…’ statements with things we can see e.g. things to do with clothes, hairstyles etc.

Once the pupils have had a few goes at things we can see move on to things we can’t see e.g. ‘Anyone who speaks another language at home, has siblings, owns a pet’ etc.

Lastly, you could suggest that pupils think about what they want for the future.

For example ‘Anyone who…wants to be a vet, who wants to live in another country when they’re older’ etc.

Variation for pupils with limited mobility:

You can run the same activity but instead of moving around the room pupils can quickly raise their hands, or a coloured card.

The last pupil to raise their hand/card leads the statement for the next turn.

ACTIVITY 2

AIM:

To get students thinking more broadly about similarity and difference.

To stimulate discussion and thinking on how these differences are often exploited to cause conflict.

To show that children may often have less prejudice than adults and that they may be able to teach adults about community cohesion.

TIME:

12-25 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 1 All of Us Film

Presentation Slides 2-3

Previous lesson recap/Re-watch film

Show the class a still image of the All of Us film. Ask pupils if they remember anything from the film and aspects of the previous All of Us lesson.

Watch the film again

If necessary, re-establish the idea that the only visible difference between the two communities in the film is the colour of their clothes and that this could represent a range of prejudice from racism to religious hatred etc.

Ask students questions based on similarity and difference (as a class discussion or think, pair, share):

  • What unites the people in the film?
  • What divides the characters in the film?
  • Why is it good to be different to someone else?
  • Why is it good to be the same as someone else?
  • How did the adults in the film treat people who were different to them?
  • What about the children? How did they treat people who were different to them?

ACTIVITY 3

AIM:

Helping students find language to discuss similarity and difference.

PHSE L11 & L12

TIME:

25-45 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 4

Kite Templates printed, one per pupil

Pens/Pencils

Identity Kites

Show students the template of a kite. Ask them what a kite is, and how it was used in the film (to signal a place to meet/friendship/ freedom).

Ask students to fill in their kites. They can respond to the statements using pictures, poems, sentences, ideas, and/or bullet points.

Encourage them to be creative. Questions on the Kite are:

  • A special food I have at home ..
  • My languages ..
  • A holiday I celebrate at home ..
  • I am unique ..

As the pupils fill in their kites some useful prompt questions include:

  • What makes you different and special?
  • What do you share with other people in your class?
  • Do you think people sometimes share feelings?
  • What happens when people play and work together?
  • How would the film have been different if the community had stayed together?

ACTIVITY 4

AIM:

To show children that our similarities and our differences should be celebrated and respected.

PHSE L11

TIME:

45-55 minutes

RESOURCE:

None needed

Sharing

Ask each student to share one thing they have written on their kites. Ask the class if there were similarities and differences between them?

Do they think it’s important that their differences and similarities are respected and celebrated?

Ask for some suggestions on how they can better celebrate similarity and differences as a class.

Keep the Kites as material for the ‘Similarity and Difference’ Classroom Display.

Classroom Display

 The children’s Kites can form the basis for the ‘Similarity and Difference’ Classroom Display. Refer to the display template for guidance.

Lesson 3: EMPATHY

Developing empathy for various characters and understanding their motivations in order to help them change.

OBJECTIVES:

Empathy: Investigating some of the characters from the All of Us through drama activities allows pupils to put themselves in someone else’s shoes and understand some of the reasons why a character may be behaving a certain way.

KEY MESSAGES:

Understanding people’s feelings and motivations for things can help us co-operate more and can lead to positive behaviour change.

LESSON LENGTH:

55 minutes

RESOURCES:

All of Us Film – if necessary

KS2 Hot Seating Activity PowerPoint Presentation

Pens/Pencils

‘Wishes for my character’ Worksheets

LINKS TO PHSE CURRICULUM

Core theme 2: Relationships

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

R1. To recognise and respond appropriately to a wider range of feelings in others.

R7. That their actions affect themselves and others.

R10. To listen and respond respectfully to a wide range of people, to feel confident to raise their own concerns, to recognise and care about other people’s feelings and to try to see, respect and if necessary constructively challenge others’ points of view.

Core theme 3: Living in the wider world – economic wellbeing and being a responsible citizen

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

L6. To realise the consequences of anti-social, aggressive and harmful behaviours such as bullying and discrimination of individuals and communities; to develop strategies for getting support for themselves or for others at risk.

ACTIVITY 1

AIM:

To remind students the aims/themes of the programme.

TIME:

0-10 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 1

All of Us film (if screening again)

Previous lesson recap

Show the class an image of the All of Us film. Ask pupils if they remember anything from the film and aspects of the previous All of Us lessons.

If necessary, watch the film again.

ACTIVITY 2

AIM:

To build empathy for various characters; to try to understand some character’s motivations for doing things(good and bad). This will help students understand how a person’s behaviour can impact others and how a person can change their behaviour.

PHSE R1 & R7

TIME:

10-30 minutes

RESOURCE:

Hot Seating Activity Slides 2–11

The questions for each character on this presentation are a guideline. Go through as many questions as you have time for and encourage pupils to ask their own.

Hot Seating

Hot Seating Definition:

A strategy in which a character or characters, played by the teacher or a student, are interviewed by the rest of the group. Hot Seating invites students to recount a specific event, explore motivation and multiple perspectives/experiences related to a theme, topic, event, or idea.

Option 1:

A whole class activity with a student or series of students playing the character/s from the All of Us film.

Give prompt questions (which can be found on the PowerPoint) to selected students to ask the character/s in the ‘hot seat’.

Encourage students to ask their own additional questions too.

Option 2:

A whole class activity with the teacher playing the character/s.

Give prompt questions (which can be found on the PowerPoint) to selected students to ask a character in the ‘hot seat’ and encourage students to ask their own questions.

For either option teachers can determine which point in the film to ‘hot seat’ our characters – during the flashback sequence when the conflict first escalated, at the bridge when the main characters are in danger etc.

It might also be useful to jump into two different time zones to see if the characters change their mind about certain things.

For example:

  • Hot seat the mum character at the end when her daughter is at
  • Then hot seat this character again in the flashback sequence when she pulled her daughter apart from her friend.
  • How does she feel about her behavior with the benefit of hindsight?

Make sure to always have the relevant character images from the presentation visible and check in to make sure students know each characters role in the film.

There are four characters to hot seat. The suggested order of hot seating is:

  • The Ponytail Character
  • The mother of the girl who falls
  • The Guard/s
  • The father who bursts the football in the playground flashback scene

ACTIVITY 3

AIM:

To help students understand how a character might change their behaviour.

PHSE R10

TIME:

30-50 minutes

RESOURCE:

‘Wishes for my character’ Worksheets – one sheet per student/pair

Wishes for the characters

Now that the class has explored some of the motivations of these characters, they will be asked to consider the future of these characters.

Hand out the Character Sheets to pupils. There are four characters so divide the class roughly into fours so an equal number of students work on each of the four characters.

Make sure that pupils write their names on the character sheets.

Students can work individually or in pairs – one sheet per individual/pair. The aim is to complete the sentences on each character sheets.

If there is time, pupils can fill in more than one sheet.

ACTIVITY 4

AIM:

To discover how different pupils think about the same characters – do they all have the same wishes or are there big differences between the pupil’s work?

TIME:

50-55 minutes

RESOURCE:

None needed

Sharing

Ask some of the students to share some of their hopes for the characters. Were there any similar ideas in the class?

Lesson 4: RESPONSABILITY

Taking Responsibility and helping the community come together.

OBJECTIVES:

Responsibility: By discussing the responsibility of people within a fictional community, pupils in the classroom can reflect on the responsibility of people within their own real life communities.

KEY MESSAGES:

Young people have a voice and are often able to recognise when they or when someone else is acting unkindly. You can always talk to a trusted adult to help you with this.

LESSON LENGTH:

55 minutes

RESOURCES:

All of Us Film

Felt Tip Pens/Colour Pencils Sugar Paper, Glue

KS2 – Lesson 4 PowerPoint Presentation

‘Message to adults’ sheets that pupils wrote in Lesson 1 ‘Wishes for my character’ worksheets

Speech Bubble Templates

Classroom Display Template (post lesson when preparing the classroom display)

LINKS TO PHSE CURRICULUM

Core theme 2: Relationships

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

R11. To work collaboratively towards shared goals.

R12. To develop strategies to resolve disputes and conflict through negotiation and appropriate compromise and to give rich and constructive feedback and support to benefit others as well as themselves.

Core theme 3: Living in the wider world – economic wellbeing and being a responsible citizen

Pupils should have the opportunity to learn:

L7. That they have different kinds of responsibilities, rights and duties at home, at school, in the community and towards the environment; to continue to develop the skills to exercise these responsibilities.

L8. To resolve differences by looking at alternatives, seeing and respecting others’ points of view, making decisions and explaining choices.

ACTIVITY 1

AIM:

To encourage conversation around how young people can contribute positively to their school and community.

PHSE L7

TIME:

0-5 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 1

Icebreaker

In pairs/small groups, ask the pupils to discuss the following:

  • What are some of the ways that a school or community could come together to celebrate similarity and difference?
  • What responsibility do we have to each other, our school and community?
  • Who can we talk to in our school or community when we are feeling unsure about something?

ACTIVITY 2

AIM:

To remind students the aims/themes of the programme.

TIME:

5-15 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 2

All of Us film (if screening again)

Previous lesson recap

Show the class still image of the All of Us film. Ask pupils if they remember anything from the film and aspects of the previous All of Us lessons.

If necessary, watch the film again.

ACTIVITY 3

AIM:

To encourage conversation around how young people can contribute positively to their school and community.

PHSE L7

TIME:

15-25 minutes

RESOURCE:

‘Message to adults’ sheets that pupils wrote in Lesson 1

Message to Adults recap

Remind the class that in the first All of Us lesson they each wrote a message to the adults in the film. They wrote this message with the aim of getting the grown-ups to stop and/or prevent the conflict.

Put the students in groups of four/five and hand the messages out to them so that they can reflect back on what they wrote.

Ask each group to share their messages with each other – within their groups do they notice any similarities between their messages?

ACTIVITY 4

AIM:

To deepen the learning and give students the opportunity to identify how conflict might arise during teamwork activities in the classroom.

PHSE R11, R12 & L8

TIME:

25-55 minutes

RESOURCE:

Sugar Paper, Felt Tip Pens Speech Bubble Templates Presentation Slide 3

Bringing our messages together

In their groups the students must come up with a group message to the adults. They can combine all of their messages or create a new joint message.

Students can write these messages in the speech bubble templates, stick them to the sugar paper, decorate the paper, add drawings etc.

If the pupils are having difficulty co-operating in their teams e.g. if conflict is arising its useful to link it back to the themes of the film and suggest to them that although its brilliant to write messages to prevent conflict, it is just as important to lead by example with our own behaviour.

Note that these group messages will be used in a classroom display.

Sharing

Ask each group to share their group messages with the class. Encourage comments, comparisons and discussion about each message with the rest of the class.

Classroom Display

Keep the groups messages for a classroom display and refer to the template for guidance.

This display can be particularly useful for helping the students link future/ ongoing classroom or playground conflict to conflict in wider society.

ASSEMBLY: TOGETHERNESS

What makes a good community?

OBJECTIVES:

Togetherness: To stimulate ideas around how pupils and staff in the school can continue positively contributing to the safety and wellbeing of the school and community.

To deepen the learning from the All of Us lessons, particularly for the pupils co-presenting the assembly.

KEY MESSAGES:

We all have brilliant ideas and we all share responsibility for making our community safe, happy and free from discrimination.

As a school community, we can find ways to come together and challenge prejudice from others and within ourselves.

ASSEMBLY LENGTH:

30 minutes

RESOURCES:

All of Us Film

All of Us Assembly

PowerPoint Presentation Relevant work from All of Us lessons for presenting

PREPARATION WITH STUDENTS PRIOR TO THE ASSEMBLY

This flexible assembly plan is called ‘What Makes A Good Community?’

The assembly involves pupils co-presenting with a teacher and sharing what has been covered in some of the All of Us lessons. Pupils will be presenting materials generated in the lessons as part of this assembly.

It’s up to teachers to decide which element to present and focus on. For example, it might be more relevant for a school to emphasize aspects around celebrating similarity and difference. In which case, teachers can choose to present the Kite activity in the assembly. See the assembly plan below for more details on how to do this.

Teachers should decide which pupils should be co-presenting the assembly. It could be a small group of students from across KS2, or it could be a whole class presentation.

Either option requires brief preparation time and we encourage teachers to arrange this in whichever way works best for the school.

ACTIVITY 1

AIM:

To get students thinking about their ideal community.

TIME:

0-10 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 1

All of Us film if relevant

Let students know that during this assembly you will be talking about:

What makes a good community

OPTIONAL

If the school has delivered the All of Us programme to all of KS2 it may not be necessary to re-watch the All of Us film, as all students will have viewed it at least once.

If the All of Us programme has only been delivered to the presenting students we strongly recommend that you screen the All of Us film in the assembly, followed by a quick post-film discussion about the themes of the film with the pupils.

ACTIVITY 2

AIM:

To get students sharing ideas about their ideal community.

TIME:

10-15 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 2

Think, pair share: 

In pairs, ask the students to discuss:

  • What makes a good community?

Give pupils 2 minutes to talk to each other about this question.

Allow around 3 minutes to take a few suggestions.

ACTIVITY 3

AIM:

To deepen the learning of the presenting students.

TIME:

15-25 minutes

RESOURCE:

Presentation Slide 3

Relevant material from lessons

Selected students share what they have learnt:

For this section, bring the presenting pupils to the front.

It’s the choice of the teacher/school to choose which activity to share back from the lessons.

We recommend that you use the following structure script for the presenting students to use regardless of what you choose to present:

Presenting Students:

We are going to talk about…

(Responsibility, similarity and difference)

 In the lessons we…

(Presenting students describe the activity/discussion)

 Let’s show you an example…

(Students share a little of the activity. E.g. they could present their kits, or share the messages they wrote to the people in the All of Us film and their suggestions for conflict prevention etc.)

This helps us to make a good community because…

(Celebrating similarity and difference shows respect, preventing conflict before it happens can help people feel safe etc.)

ACTIVITY 4

AIM:

n/a

TIME:

25-30 minutes

RESOURCE:

None needed

Wrapping up

The teacher ends the assembly by reminding the pupils that it is everyone’s responsibility to make a good community; that there are small actions we can do every day such as showing kindness, or reducing our anger that can help make everyone in the community feel safe, happy, valued and respected.